Jefferson Health to build $760 million specialty-care pavilion

Jefferson Health and Thomas Jefferson University will build a $762 million specialty care center in Center City, the academic health system announced Thursday.

The 19-story Specialty Care Pavilion will house Jefferson’s Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, the Digestive Health Institute, Jefferson Transplant Institute and Korman Respiratory Institute as well as other service lines related to cardiovascular health, neurology, otolaryngology, rheumatology and urology. The health system will repurpose, consolidate or sell more than 177,000 square feet across 10 buildings as it continues to centralize its service lines.

“We can’t design the future of care delivery in buildings from the past,” Dr. Bruce Meyer, president of Jefferson Health, said in prepared remarks. “To reshape health care, redefine education, and revitalize care in our communities, we must create new settings in which breakthroughs are possible.”

Jefferson did not specify if the consolidation of specialty services will lead to layoffs, noting in a statement that “the building will help care for the growing needs of our community while maximizing our current and growing service lines.”

After the four-year construction process, the 462,000-square-foot building will feature more than 300 exam rooms, 58 infusion chairs, 10 operating rooms, six endoscopy rooms, imaging and lab services as well as a pharmacy. It will also set aside space for potential future development.

The project is backed by the former chief executive officer of Apple, John Sculley, who will optimize the building’s design and technology for the patient experience, executives said, adding that he will also help with fundraising. Jefferson aims to raise $1 billion by its 200th anniversary in 2024 to support an array of capital projects.

The pavilion is part of National Real Estate Development’s $1 billion East Market revitalization plan. The plan earmarks $35 million to improve streets, pedestrian walkways and open spaces, among other public infrastructure upgrades.


Source: modernhealthcare.com

Tags: covid-19, pandemic

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